149 Soccer

Simon talks about his love for soccer and his team back home.


Todd: Simon, what is you hobby?

Simon: Playing soccer.

Todd: OK. Wow, you play soccer?

Simon: Of course!

Todd: How often do you play?

Simon: Now I don't play, but before I played about three or four times a week.

Todd: Wow, that's quite a bit. -- How come you don't play now?

Simon: I've retired.

Todd: You've retired.

Simon: Yeah, I came to Japan. I had a soccer team, but now that I work in Japan I can't play for my soccer team at home.

Todd: OK. Do you watch soccer on TV?

Simon: These days? No! No time. Always working at Seitoku.

Todd: OK. Yeah, we, we all have to work I guess. Um..who is the best soccer player in the world?

Simon: That's hard to say. Right now, there's a kid named Ronaldino for Brazil. Maybe he will be the best.

Todd: OK. Nice. An..and what is you favorite soccer team?

Simon: Deep Cove Royals. That's my soccer team.

Todd: OK. Great. All right. Thanks a lot.

Learn Vocabulary from the lesson

how come

How come you don't play now?

"How come" is another way to say "why" when asking a question.  Notice the following:

  1. How come you never call me anymore?
  2. How come she doesn't believe me?


I've retired from soccer.

We usually use the word "retire" to talk about when we stop working because we are too old or have enough money and never have to work again.  Notice the following:

  1. When are you going to retire?
  2. He retired two years ago and has been traveling a lot since then.

these days

These days? No! I've no time.

"Recently" is another way to say "these days."  It is similar to "in the last few weeks."  Notice the following:

  1. What do you do for fun these days?
  2. He has been really busy with his studies these days.


That's hard to say.

In this sentence "hard" can be replaced with "difficult."  The example sentence refers to something that is difficult to predict or expect.  Notice the following:

  1. It's hard to believe you will be 23 years old tomorrow.
  2. It was very hard for him to find a good job.

right now

Right now, there's a kid named Ronaldino.

"Currently" is another way to say "right now."  We can use this to talk about something in the immediate present.  Notice the following:

  1. Where are you right now?
  2. I need you to come home right now.  There has been an accident.


Answer the following questions about the interview.

Keep Listening

Below are some more great lessons!

Vocabulary Challenge

Complete the sentences with the words below.
how come • retired • these days
hard • right now
  1. Her husband last year and now he plays a lot of golf.
  2. I don't know where he is but I can have him call you back later.
  3. you didn't come to my party?
  4. He has been really tired .
  5. It's to focus on my work with all of this noise.