1287 Foods We Hate

Josh and Todd talk about certain foods they really dislike eating or refuse to eat.


Todd: So Josh, you’re a teen still, correct?

Josh: Yeah, that’s right.

Todd: Okay, so I thought we would talk about things you love and hate.

Josh: Things I love and hate. Okay.

Todd: Because I remember when I was younger, back in the day like there were certain foods I hated, certain things I hated to do. As you get older, you know, you kind of learn to adapt and you don’t hate them so much. So for example, you know what is a food that you just really dislike?

Josh: Yeah. That’s an easy one. I really don’t like pickled plums.

Todd: Pickled plums, yeah? Why, is it the taste or the texture?

Josh: Something about just how sour they are and I guess it’s really pickled anything except pickles. So I like pickles but I don’t really like anything else pickled.

Todd: So like you don’t like pickled carrots? You don’t like pickled...

Josh: Yeah, pickled herring.

Todd: Pickled cucumber.

Josh: Pickled cucumbers, picked artichoke, anything like that.

Todd: Right. I guess though, pickle is a cucumber, isn’t it?

Josh: Yeah, a pickle is a cucumber, that’s right.

Todd: Right. So they do it sometimes, they do it a different way with other cucumbers.

Josh: Yeah. So I don’t mind pickles, but other kinds of pickling.Todd: Right. Okay. Is there any other food that you don’t like, like any cooked dish you don’t like, any meat or anything like that?

Josh: Not really, I basically like all food. That might be a part of being a teenager.

Todd: Wow! When I was ... even to this day, I still cannot stand liver. I never eat liver. Yeah. Can you eat it?

Josh: I can eat it. I don’t ... I wouldn’t say I like it but I don’t hate it.

Todd: Oh man, it tastes like metal. Josh: Yeah. Todd: You know. So, both of us we lived in Asia and they have lots of different meat here than our home country which is America. So for example, tongue, can you eat tongue?

Josh: Can I eat tongue? I can force it down but I guess I would say I hate tongue, yeah.

Todd: Yeah. Because like if you go to a Korean barbecue they always have the tongue.

Josh: Yeah, that’s true. I guess I kind of feel bad because, you know, it’s not actually that bad but just the idea of it being tongue is like, man, I can’t eat that.Todd: It’s actually not the visual for me, I don’t mind that it’s a cow’s tongue, it just, I don't know, it's pretty chewy, it doesn’t taste that good.

Josh: It’s true, it’s chewy. Yeah.

Todd: Yeah. Okay, what about if you buy chicken? Lots of cultures like to eat chicken heart.

Josh: Chicken heart, yeah, not a fan of chicken heart, definitely hate that.

Todd: Yeah. That’s really chewy, that’s hard to chew.

Josh: Really chewy, yeah, not good.

Todd: Yeah. Yeah, okay. What about the cartilage? Sometimes, you ever had like the fried cartilage, like chicken cartilage?

Josh: I actually have a short story about that sort of, I went to a restaurant and I ordered what I thought was chicken. I asked whether it was chicken and they said, “Oh yeah, it’s chicken.” And when I got it, I took a big bite of one and it was chicken cartilage. And I’ve never had that before and it was like kind of crunchy, it tasted like fried chicken bone or something. I'm not into it. And I called the waitress and asked her what it was and she pointed to her elbow and said, “Chicken elbow." And I said “Oh, thank you.” You know, I muscled down a few more and left the rest on the plate but...

Todd: Yeah, I’m with you, man. I've made that same mistake, yeah. There’s just some stuff. What about pig’s feet?

Josh: Pig’s feet, yeah. My grandma really loves pig’s feet and she’ll always try to get me to eat pickled pig’s feet and bean pickled and just pig’s feet, not into it.

Todd: Right. So that was a double whammy, right?

Josh: Yeah, absolutely.

Todd: So actually, it’s a triple whammy I guess. Disgusting part of the animal, doesn’t sound, you know, it doesn’t sound good or look good. Yeah, and it’s pickled.Josh: And it's pickled, yeah.

Learn Vocabulary from the lesson

back in the day

Back in the day like there were certain foods I hated

Back in the day means a long time ago. Notice the following:

  1. Back in the day, there were no computers.
  2. She used to walk to school back in the day.


I really don’t like pickled plums.

Pickled means preserved with vinegar. Notice the following:

  1. Pickled radishes last longer than fresh ones.
  2. She pickled lots of fruits and vegetables for the winter.

muscled down

I muscled down a few more and left the rest on the plate.

To muscle down is the force something down. Here it means to swallow. Notice the following:

  1. I muscled down the carrots, even though I don't like them.
  2. She muscled down four bites of chicken.

I'm with you

I’m with you, man. I've made that same mistake.

"I'm with you means "I agree".Notice the following:

  1. I'm with you. Tennis is the best sport.
  2. "I prefer dogs to cats". "I'm with you".

double whammy

So that was a double whammy, right?

A double whammy is when two things, usually bad, happen at once. Notice the following:

  1. I crashed my bike and I was late to work. It was a double whammy.
  2. What a double whammy; it's unhealthy and it tastes bad.
Answer the following questions about the interview.

Vocabulary Challenge

Complete the sentences with the words below.
back in the day • pickle • muscle
with you • whammy
  1. Paying the tax and the fine was a double .
  2. I was a good singer .
  3. He tried to down the food, but couldn't .
  4. I'm , bro. I totally agree.
  5. You vegetables with vinegar.